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20130121
20130129
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tend to be older men, educated in a certain way that didn't study such matters and most historians were not educated in the matter office -- matters of the heart and the hearth. but by studying the first ladies -- the first think thomas jefferson did after spending 1 days cooped up in a loft outside of philadelphia, writing the declaration of independence, the first thing he did was he went shopping for martha, his wife. he was pregnant and had had a miscarriage, and he bought her some gloves. then he begged off from serving for the rest of the summer so he could go home to be with his wife. every within -- every interof -- every winter of the revolutionary war, there was martha washington. i propose washington's closer advisor was alexander hamilton, and one chapter talks about hamilton's history of womanizing, bill clinton was not the first and was not the worst when it comes to misbehavior and high office. there's a long history. itot spitzer, arnold schwarzenegger, david petraeus, had nothing on alexander hamilton. if you read letters written by martha washington during those winter
, deeply grounded in our education and how it has prepared us as women and the leaders and the fact that your mom was very much an activist in the movement, and they need to know about it. i'm working on the book, this book. i said well, can i help you, can i get it published and that is how this journey began. >> bernice, when did your mother began her activism? she was born in marion alabama? >> i ron ackley if you study history, three of the leading movement, ralph abernathy and my father all have lives in alabama. how ironic is that. my mother didn't know one leader after that. she no one was much younger but they didn't know, you know, that kind of stuff and it just brought it all together. and so, growing up there in rural alabama with a father who was an entrepreneur early on and he called lumber and he did open an assault mel by a white gentleman. the father's determination to stand up to justice and continue to move to really influenced her and that produced a lot of the leaders in the nation. missionaries came and educated the reactive and why am i here driven by the fact
that our education and how it prepared us as women to be leaders and the fact that your mom was very much an activist involved in the peace movement and they need to know about her. and i said i'm working on this book. i said can i help you? get it published? this is how the journey began. >> host: bernice king your mother come to how active bushy and when did she begin her activism? was born in marion alabama? >> guest: ironically if you study history three of the leading persons in the movement ralph abernathy and my father i'll had wives from carrie county alabama. how ironic is that and mom did not know of one data abernathy. when the movement started they didn't know about them marrying different men in all of that kind of stuff and have brought it all together. and so growing up there in rural alabama with the father who was an entrepreneur or entrepreneur or leon and unheard of as an african-american had his own truck. he hauled lumber. he did open a sawmill and it was burned down by a white gentleman he hired. he would not let that stop them. implements a separate father's determi
of the commission. >> president carter appointed you. >> carter appointed me when i left his education, running education. yet in the department of education and i went back to teaching at the appointed me to the commission. >> at what point to become the the u.s. civil rights commission will become a permanent agency? >> after the first year when the reports that they did -- with the commission did was instead of sitting down and saying, okay. we are here as a safety valve and don't really -- they did some hearings. major power that the commission has, and a point this out in the book. to me it is the most important thing about the commission. does what it is supposed to do it will go out and listen to people that nobody else will listen to. problems, civil rights problems that people had that they could not get anyone to pay attention, not just local people but the federal government. it would write letters, do all kinds. no one would pay any attention. the sole rights commission decided that first year it would go out and listen to these people and see what they had to say. they had the powe
funds our priorities. it proposes an increase in funding for education. including full-day kindergarten and we fully fund the teachers pension each of the next two years. [applause] education funding represents 64% of our state expenditures. in addition, we provide $18 million over the next few years to ensure that all hoosier workers have the skills that they need to find a job in today's economy. [applause] since i believe that we need new jobs, we are investing nearly $350 million in excess reserves on indiana's roads and bridges and infrastructure of today and tomorrow. [applause] our budget creates a partnership and because indiana is agriculture, we envision our state becoming a hub of agricultural breakthroughs by supporting the development of an agricultural court order. indiana will continue to lead across the midwest and the world. [applause] our budget also ensures that the indiana economic development corporation is adequately equipped to attract more to the hoosier state and to operate with greater transparency and accountability to the public. [applause] lastly, it was abr
, the education. we should have spent less and save more. we should have borrowed a lot less from foreigners. one of the things a lot of people don't get, housing is consumption because people think that they invested in the house they think it's an investment. it's not. we consume a house just like an automobile if you over invest in housing what you are doing is over consuming. so a massive over consumption. it's analogous to the agricultural example. and in that process, we taught millions of people how to do the wrong thing. we taught them how to be mortgage bankers, residential legal attorneys, those millions of people are trying to learn to do something new that is productive and a global economy which is one reason it's been so it difficult to deal with what i imply that. in addition, construction is competitive with manufacturing rates. if you drive of construction wages you try to find a factor in wages which we do with an artificial construction boom and that drew millions of manufacturing jobs overseas to places like india and china. initially the people in india and china didn't know
education. got a new department of education. >> host: at what point do you become for the civil rights commission would become a permanent agency in a sense? >> guest: after the first year , what the commission did this instead of sitting down seine which is here as a safety valve, they different hearings. the major power the commission had an ipod this in the book continues the most important thing. when it does what it's supposed to do, it will go out and listen to people nobody else will listen to. the civil rights problems that people had that they could not get anyone to pay attention. not just local people, but the federal government would write letters. nobody would pay attention. the civil rights commission decided they would go out of that they had decided and they had the power under the statute to subpoena anyone. eisenhower said the reason i want to get it passed by congress to set up an executive orders because my attorney general tells me that's the only way they can subpoena anybody. some people may not want to come to testify, said the commission has the most important
in the wrong place we should invest in education, manufacturing, te chnology. should have spent less and save more and borrow bus from foreigners. one thing people don't get it is housing is consumption. they think they invested in the house if it is an investment. but we consume a house if you invest you are really over consuming. we had a massive over consumption in that process we taught millions of people how to do the wrong thing, build houses, residential and legal attorneys those people try to learn how to do something productive in a global economy which is why it is difficult to deal with unemployment. if you drive up construction wages we did that with the artificial construction that had millions of manufacturing jobs overseas like india and china. initially they did not know how to do that well and now we have a difficult time to get the jobs back. how did we make a mistake? the markets are constantly in correction process but never of that magnitude. government policy is needed for that type of mistake the federal reserve, the fdic in government housing. and a fundamental context
of diseases, to what extent have been noticed efforts to educate the human population on how to modify their lifestyle so it is better to avoid the crossover and spillover? >> there are certainly efforts. in bangladesh they're trying to educate people not to drink raw date palm staff that contains a virus. if you put the stuff you can kill the virus but people like to drink it raw. it is a tradition, a seasonal treat so there are things like that around the world. in southern china they crack down on the big what markets, at least above ground, and big wedge markets, sold live for food as a fashion in southern china, they call it wild flavor, a vote for eating wild life, not because people need the protein for subsistence, they have some money and this is considered a very robust and tasty food. one other thing on that in terms of education, of local people, i mentioned the original spillover, pandemic strain in southeastern cameron, i went to retrace probably the route it took coming out of southeastern cameron and down a river system that came along the main stem condo and eventually
, and any of you who doubt the power of public education, it is great, i can tell you that. we raise her family and a century-old farmhouse in the yakima valley. i'd also like you to meet my three boys and their families, connor, joe, jack and his wife megan, our grandson brody, and the newest inslee, zoe ann. [applause] this is a very special day for my family. all of our elected families. and this is a very special time for many other families in our state for this reason. people all across washington stood up for fairness and family in approving marriage equality last november. we should all be proud. [applause] we should all be proud. the vote on referendum 74 represents the best of who we are as a state. it should be an inspiration for the progress we can make, always towards equality, always towards fairness, always towards justice all across the state of washington. it has been an amazing journey over the past year and a half, as i've traveled to all corners of the state. i am a 5th generation son of the state of washington, and am proud to have roots in this state that are as wid
's program. so whether it's bridging and roads or medical research or education or a number of other things fall under the discretionary category including definite spending. i simply say, we have to come to the realization that unless we can address our mandatory spending, which is running away with the budget and ever shrinking's congress' ability about how we use discretionary spending. unless we can get control of that, everybody is going fall short of what they want. i'm not debating as more money should go to medical research or building infrastructure or whatever. i'm simply saying all is being squeezed and i'm asking you to support your senator or senators or representatives in giving them the backbone and the courage to stand up we have to address this or everybody loses. and i think that is the message of the day. and now we had an election over that issue. we're having a debate in congress every day over that issue. until this point, the president has not indicated post election that he's all that happy about addressing the mandatory spending issue. and we can't get there until h
of education decision. as people like barbara johns, the high school student that led a walkout of the segregated school because of protesting in the interior education. that's in 1951 we don't even know their names anymore even with rosa parks and montgomery. there were two other teenagers who did the same thing. as of this resistance, largely among the young people. >> host: on both sides is and it? >> guest: definitely. when you talk about south africa we all remember nelson mandela it was the students and others that revised the movement that was more abundant in the late 60's. >> host: he did something that got a lot of criticism for him and dr. king. tell that story about the crusade. >> guest: he was at a crucial point in birmingham. he gave a direction in march and millions of people followed him, completely wrong. from montgomery which came didn't initiate through birmingham, king is a leader but only in birmingham can he initiate and sustain the movement but that point in april of 1963 all of the people that are adults that are looking to get arrested had already been
vs. board of education decision killing of civil-rights workers, the young high-school student who led a walkout to protest against fifth inferior education. 1951. many people we don't even know there names or other teenagers who did the same thing. so the resistance largely among young people. >> definitely when you talk about south africa, we all remember nelson mandela who was in a prison cell. for others to revived a movement in the early '70s and the late '60s. >> host: talking about children, james did something that got a lot of criticism for him and dr. king. >> guest: king was at a crucial point* in birmingham with millions of people across the country followed him. from montgomery which king did not initiate, through birmingham, king is a leader in search of a following. only in birmingham can he initiate and sustain a movement the dow reached a crucial point* in 1963 all those who were adults who were willing to get arrested already had been arrested. he writes his letter from the birmingham jail. it was not clear he bush win in birmingham. if he lost there would be no m
republic has achieved far more progress outcomes in alleviating poverty, health care, providing educational access and expanding opportunities for women in the shah's regime aggregate. hillary and i are happy to go into this morning q&a if you like, let me give you a couple examples of what i'm talking about. the islamic republic has developed a hope your system that is greatly increase and reduce infant and child mentality in iran. the provision of health care to rural areas has been particularly impressive since the revolution. the islamic republic is basically equalized outcomes in urban and rural setting in a knot or which is really quite extraordinary in an international context. get this. there are no iranian doctors and public health specialists working with state university and ngos state of mississippi to introduce iranian styled rural health care delivery into medically underserved parts of the mississippi delta. the islamic republic is also greatly expanded educational opportunities with letter series and basically eliminating gender disparity in educational access. one facet of
, a successful farmers, people who had high education. and they traveled the world and learned from other cultures. they had out -- studied government from other countries from taking and choosing from the various things and do come up with creative solutions for the issues they thought had not been resolved. what i am gratified is more people are voting now than they have in the past years. it is their obligation. to not let the country just happened. but create the country they want. that is why i tell people when they ask how you feel about the immigration law? how do you feel? because they generally have cases and i don't want to people to believe i made at my mind. i haven't prettify express an opinion that is what they will believe. but having said that, what i often say is why aren't you asking yourself? what you doing about it? if you thank you don't like something? that is what your country was founded on with your people getting up and starting a war to start a country i am not suggesting a rebellion. [laughter] far from that, please. but i am encouraging civic responsibility. w
. education, human capital, the ability to work with information technology. these are huge determinants. many people in american society today cannot afford by themselves to get the kind of education. to make resources available, support younger people, support families, institute, human capital, that is good for them, that's good for the economy and that's good for the tax base. over the medium term it will strengthen the projects. >> in terms of competitiveness, worldwide, building a stronger workforce from, as you mentioned, early childhood education to access to a college education is really vital to american competitiveness, isn't it? >> it's the number one determined that both our competitiveness, and our productivity, how much do we produce. number one determined, looking forward, human capital, education, that ability to innovate, ability to work with new technologists. >> over the short run, what is the effect of a cross the board cuts on early childhood education, on pell grants, on research funding for medical research and other basic scientific research? .. >> thank you, mr. chair
concerned about, people are concerned about health care costs and education costs. and to a lesser extent, when economic growth is stronger as it was later in the bush years maybe they're concerned about issues related to the bottom and so. education and health care and sort of the broader challenge of globalization, those things loom incredibly large and the republican imagination and those are not issues republicans like to talk about. this is where compassion conservatism didn't emerge any backing to emerge in the late 1990s from a period when bill clinton had been something republicans up and down washington for four, six years. and the whole point of bush's him was to craft a republican party that had something to say about education. that's something to say about health care. you can go back and said, i think justifiably, that something like the prescription drugs bill was too big, cost too much, should've bee been paid fn someone been paid for and so wanted you to make similar critiques with no child left behind by the republican party will never get back to the wilderness if it ju
. they were people who had higher education's and they actually travel the world and learn from other cultures. the constitution was written by men who had studied the government's through history and other countries and picking and choosing from the various things that they saw describing the things they felt didn't work and coming up with creative solutions for the issues they thought hadn't been resolved by others. more people are voting now than they had in past years because of worries me when the citizens for debt that it is their obligation not to let the country just happened, but to create a the country that they want. they tell me how did you feel about immigration lollies, the immigration law, how do you feel about the debate on the amendment and there are always questions like that would be called i generally have the cases i am still considering our that we have made up our mind because i haven't. but if i express an opinion, that is what they will believe. having said that what you can say to them is why are you asking me? why aren't you asking yourself? what do you think? and wh
. it was in a book about teaching kids how to smoke weed, but an educational book about how they might talk to their kids about a difficult subject with him i don't run into. so that's where the format is an illustrated picture book for kids. as i got into the subject and started looking into train, which is relevant to some children's lives. their children but pickett, families involved in the oppressive policies to eradicate coca and it's a social or cultural issue. as i got deeper into the history of coca and specifically with relationships of the coca-cola company, origins from a medical marvel to the drug problem we have today, it got really complicated and so now it's a book for adults. i also started in coca with coffee because they wanted to do a comparison is not in that fascinated me with the way the drugs, plants change their perceptions over time for the cultural perceptions, the legal, social perceptions. as inspired by michael collins spoke about body of desire, where he talks about the history for different plants. when apples came to this country, they want the fleshy fruit
. there's personal-finance out of this over a period of years. our goal is to educate people for that great depression will never happen again. it's very much in the wake of its time. and i get that we can teach people certain skills. if they learn the skills we will all be okay. >> the dark side of the personal-finance industry with helaine olen saturday night at 10 on c-span2. look for more booktv online, like is on facebook. >> what's the best training for policeman? >> the best training you can get to become a really good police officer is to understand what it's all about. i will say that to the day i die. you learn to develop forces. you learn how to use intelligence information. you learn how to leverage relationships in a community at that is key. people in the 20 trust you, they will tell you when to our things that are happening that are not yet crimes. so that you can intervene. they will tell you all about how to go about doing it. i really learned the most of my career from those relationships. >> from high school dropout and single mother t to the youngest polic
in the civil rights movement? >> guest: a lot of things to. it is his death, the brown v. board of education decision. it was the killing of civil rights for yours. it is people like robert johns, the young high school student who got a walkout on the segregated school because of protesting against the inferior education in 1851. many people we don't even know their names anymore before rosa parks, two other teenagers did the same thing. so this resistant, virtually among young people. >> guest: when we talk about south africa, it was the students in soweto. we all remember nelson mandela, that nelson and all of a sudden he presents no. it is those students who revived, stephen biko another survived a movement in the early 70s family 60s. >> host: is james bevel, talking about children, young people leading the way to contain that got a lot of criticism for him and dr. king. tell that story. >> guest: again come a king was at a crucial point in birmingham. we had this image that king david direction we should march millions of people across the country. that's completely wrong. from a camera
during the darkest periods in our shared history? will the commend the work of the holocaust educational trust? >> i think my honorable friend speaks for the whole house and a developed country and raising his find -- final issue and praising the holocaust education trust. absolutely brilliant organization that make sure young people from schools across our country get the opportunity to go and see the places where the terrible events of the holocaust took place. i had privileges we could meeting with a survivor whose story was truly heroic and truly heartbreaking. but who in her 90s is still making these arguments in making this case so that future generations will and. we should also learn not just about the european holocaust but what has happened recently in rwanda, in bosnia, in cambodia and elsewhere that tragically there is far too much prejudice in our world. >> ed miliband. [shouting] >> mr. speaker, can i join the prime minister in thing to be to kingsman david robert shaw of first battalion the duke of lancaster's regiment. each of the utmost courage and bravery and the condol
is to educate people so that the great depression will never happen again. but it is of its time. the idea that we can teach people certain skills and that they learn these skills, we will all be okay. >> the dark side of the personal-finance industry on "after words" on c-span2. look for more booktv online. like us on facebook. >> british prime minister david cameron says that if the conservative party is returned to power at the next election, there will be a general referendum on britain's future in the european union. he outlined the new relationships in europe. this is a little bit more than 40 minutes. >> i would like to thank limburg for hosting this this morning. this morning i would like to talk about the future of europe. but first let us remember the past. seven years ago, europe was being torn apart by a catastrophic conflict. the skies of london lit by flames night after night. millions dead across the world in the battle for peace and liberty. as we remember the sacrifice, so we should also remember how the shift in europe for more to sustain peace came about. it didn't happe
was going on. >> we really understood the press s educational media media, educational tv. everything that had been going on that we were involved in had been going on 100 years. it was very hard to get out. this was 1963, i was reminded fred came to get martin luther king on the 17th of december to promise he would come to birmingham this year because on the 14th f-15 to fred's church was bombed for the third time in 1962. the bombings of homes receive no publicity. but fred was quite frank that he needed martin luther king to come to get any attention to this injustice. another good friend that was with us was a cameraman was quite blunt with me about it saying you have to cut me some slack because i've got to keep the camera on dr. king. if they kill him and i don't get a picture of it, i lose my job. it was almost that cold and analysis wear -- where martin luther king knew he was being used to focus on this injustice. and did it willingly. at the same time guys like jack nelson understood that and the cameraman was lawrence peers who had been with a friend of martin's since montg
young people make it through, um, you know, their educational goals, college or graduate school, in light of runaway tuition. >> yes. >> is that right? okay. do you want -- >> and also -- [inaudible] >> right. >> i mean, how are we going to get the doctors if tuition is 70 grand a year? >> we write in the booking about how -- in the book about how hard it is for homeless kids in the cities in which they live today just get through high school. the challenge that so many kids confront, and liz murray wrote, you know, a beautiful memoir, "breaking night," about her journey from homelessness to harvard, how are we going to create opportunities for kids whose families won't or can't take care of them who have been told over and over again you're broken because they're poor or their parents hate them or reject them because they're gay or lesbian. these kids feel so damaged that college feels like another planet to them. and we write in the book about the game changing things that cities and nonprofits are doing to create high schools that are connected to homeless youth centers. ther
, that gets transferred into education, and then people make wiser decisions. i think, like you said, i mean how there's access to meth, these dirty, cheap, bad drugs, people were able to get access to much more benign drugs like marijuana, they might make decisions that if they had the education to know that this is actually a healthier choice for you. it's a harm reduction model. we might not ever get rid of drugs completely, but there are safer alternatives to the worse options. >> we have one last question over here in the corner for the evening, and then we're going to have to wrap up this portion and move on to the book signing. so the last question for the evening. >> okay. i wanted to thank you, very, very good presentation. and i think you presented a very good case where the coca leaf is innocuous or even beneficial substance. however, it is true you get cocaine from the coca, and cocaine is quite a, um, well, it's, a substance where you can make a lot of money. and you've got the drug cartels involved in that. how can you control the growth of coca without getting the drug cartels
they are so close to to the changing social make up. who is the educated workforce and the united states anymore? it's mostly women, more and more diverse. if you work it exxon and mobil and go on to your family thanksgiving dinner and say i work and exxon mobile, they suck in their breath in distain a worry, you know, that is not a winning strategy. something has to give. i'm not sure that they think that. >> it seems to me that kind of we are who we are in take-it-or-leave-it, we really don't care, has that backfired? having come a seems that could have been a force to cultivate more distrust and distaste and helped make them, as you say in the book, you know, public enemy number one. >> yeah. well, it is a great question and a kind of complicated one. one of my goals as a reporter was to try to understand the best record and think about what it was like to be so unpopular. does it matter? because their default view is it doesn't matter to my to select a statement. we are we are. in truth i think there are consequences. part of it is talent recruitment and retention in the real world,
on a 140 foot sailing ship, the seat association education, i was at sea for three weeks away from telephones, internet and libraries. but i was in the middle of a research project on benjamin franklin that required me to read material in french. i decided to use my time at sea to revise my french by reading a novel in that language. the book i chose is a small paperback edition of jules verne's around the world in 80 days first published as a newspaper serial in 1882. when i wasn't on watch or otherwise busy on the ship by slowly made my way to the book. my french was good enough to my surprise that i enjoyed the story and as a historian i appreciated it. a detail. especially the nature of the sense the protagonist racing around world. at his london club he remarks offhandedly that scheduled travel services could take a person around the globe in a period of the days. proved it, a challenge him and he is off. the att measure was only conceivable by the late nineteenth century. in the age of sail getting around world had taken months or even years. the speed of my sailing ship woul
, without education, the province will not be able to come out of the crisis. 768 schools bombed in the area. 58 schools bombed in this year, last year, 2012. i have not seen any major effort on the part of pakistan political government or military government to take up these major causes. unless pakistan, the status quo will not change. thank you. >> thank you. so, i'm going to focus on the afghan taliban which is a completely different than the pakistan taliban. my chapter on time harwich is one i'm going to focus on really covers 2002 as a major predictor reason i did this is because i believe that the patterns did they really were locked in by 2004. you know, i went back, looked to the chapter and i was trying to think about what could be cleaned from that period of the relevant for today. i was surprised to see, in fact most of the dynamics that are taking place on the ground in 2002 and 2003 in kinston and in kandahar are completely relevant to what's happening today. what i see happening today is to key questions that we need to sort of grapple with. the first is what happens when the
and it would be a tragedy if this country moved in a direction to make education less affordable. so we as a university are very dependent and concerned about the fiscal health of this country. >> host: amy gutmann, are you also in the classroom at the university? >> guest: i enjoy teaching and take every opportunity to meet with students, talk to students and teacher my spare time. >> host: what does a provost do and how library at princeton? >> guest: i was at princeton for 28 years of the time i got my phd to the time i came to pan and was dean of the faculty at princeton and the chief academic and financial officer at princeton or the progress works closely with the president. >> host: with the learning curve on being president of the university? >> guest: well, the learning curve is steep for anybody and it's also very exciting. >> host: gives a primer. just go the university of pennsylvania had 10,000 undergraduates and 10 dozen graduate students. we have about 4500 faculty members. we ran three hospitals and we have a great school of medicine as well as a great school of arts and
finance over a period of years and her goal is to educate people so the great depression will never happen again. but it's very much in a buy of its time an idea we can teach people certain skills and if they learn the skills will all be okay. >> california senator dianne feinstein proposed legislation today that would then so-called assault weapons and ammunition magazines with more than 10 rounds. she was joined by other members of congress as well as police officers and mayors around the country. this is a little more than an hour. >> i want to thank all of you for coming today and i really want to welcome you. i am pleased to be joined this morning by a cross-section of americans who have been affected by gun violence. we have with us today police chiefs, mayors, teachers,.yours, members of the clergy, mothers, gun safety groups, victims of gun violence and others who care deeply about the issue. i'd really like to thank my colleagues in the senate and in the house who have chosen to stand together on this important issue. some of us have been working to provide violence for decades. t
that would regenerate our interest in research and development and in education. the sputnik launch in 1957. it may been to a younger generation to defuse because sputnik is probably not as -- as it is to the older generation but i was pretty clever. most of his slogans were not really caught on. the first summer he was in wishing to and he said, and it's a strange construct but he said in august this is the time when the shinki and becomes more -- and nobody knows what it means. somehow it's applicable. [laughter] so on that low note, i think i'm going to see if you guys have any questions that you want to talk about. yes, sir m.? >> i'm surprised you didn't mention the president's that we popularly think are so eloquent john f. kennedy. where they just good at regular words? >> john f. kennedy had some wonderful phrases and new frontier was his. but they were eloquent in their sensibility and the speeches. it wasn't that they created a term that was everlasting and some of them have interesting -- you would go to new frontier and go to term and. truman had costs are. he brought that bac
and her goal is to educate people about the great depression will never happen again but it is the a deal we can teach people certain skills and we will be o.k. but overtime personal finance slowly becomes severed. so which is less about the political backbone to be fair to sylvia porter is a huge part of her thinking as a devout keynesian and is simply up a list of tips like how to cook the perfect stew or how to train and -- toilet trade your toddler. and follow these 10 steps did you will be okay and then it has to work out and if it didn't, then you didn't follow the 10 steps. it is all on you. that is over a period of years. >> host: do see this a parallel with financial media if you don't look like us young gorgeous anorexic model if you are not saving 100,000 per year with 25 percent return of retiring at age 42 there is something wrong with you? >> guest: i had not thought of it that way but sitting up in the office that both they say i put the 90 lb. perfect woman and make some teenager in des moines and feel terrible. that is not what she is trying to do but there is a parallel.
the call to serve throughout his career. his work on issues from education and transportation to civil rights and national service has advanced the causes of our party immeasurably. please join me in thanking our retiring officers. [applause] they have done a remarkable service for the entire country. [applause] >> now, let me introduce our slate of new dnc officers. they are a talented, dedicated and passionate group of people who will strengthen and energize our party. maria elena will serve as vice chair of the dnc. maria's work as executive secretary-treasurer at the los angeles county federation of labor and years of service reaffirm our party's steadfast commitment to american workers. maria will strengthen the already-powerful bond between the dnc and our brothers and sisters in the labor movement. my friend, congresswoman gab earth of hawaii, with your support today will serve as ice varian. a-- vice chair. along with our colleague of illinois is also one of the first female combat veterans to serve in congress. [applause] congresswoman's story is an inspiration and showcases t
, technology, engineering, mathematics education programs. 209 of those. surface transportation, 100 plus. picture quality, 82 programs. economic development 88. transportation assistance, 80 financial literacy among 56 different programs, job training forty-seven different job training programs. homelessness and the prevention, assistance, plenty programs. food for the hundred and 18. disaster response prepared this cannot be met, 17 different programs. >> well, it is not just a land is that we have that many programs. what is also outlandish as we don't know if they're working because when they are passed there is nothing that says you have to have a metric to see if it is accomplishing the goal. in the base defect of the congress since i have been here has been the total lack of oversight of most of the programs. >> you recount in the book a story about taking an amendment to the senate floor to get rid of some of these duplication programs, duplicative programs. what happened? why did it pass? >> we had one for $2 million pass but all the rest of failed. >> why? >> because all of thes
and more importantly how to educate, train and develop leaders for the future. we are witnessing examples of increasing afghan national security force capabilities. i'll give you just one example. in november, the afghan berean corps successfully connected level operations across regional command south. these operations included all security element, police, army and afghan plan come afghan led the logistically supported by afghan forces. this is plan and conduct game the supply and separate resupply missions conducted by emerging afghan air force using helicopters. the afghan organizations demonstrate independently security force that assistance will focus at the next organizational level. while this supports a smaller footprint, it is not simply about doing life. this is about putting our advising and enabling resources in the right places at the right levels within the afghan national security force to ensure that afghan partners can hold the gains of the past. this is about the right mix this capabilities to security while continuing to support the afghan national security forces as t
, an outside moment that would regenerate our interest in research and development and in education and stuff, as had the sputnik launch in the 1957. it may have been to a younger generation it may have been too diffuse, because sputnik is probably not as big a thing as it is to an older generation, but that was pretty clever. but most of his slogans, most of his abilities so far have not, have not really caught on. the first summer he was in washington he said, and it's a strange construct, but he said in august he said this is the time when washington becomes all wee weed up and things are hard to get done. no one really knows what it means, but it's somehow applicable. [laughter] so on that low note, i think i'm going to see if you guys have any questions and want to talk about these things. yes, ma'am. >> i'm surprised that you didn't mention the president that we popularly think are the most eloquent; ronald reagan and john f. kennedy. were they just good at regular words, or did they -- >> oh, no, they had, i mean, john f. kennedy had wonderful phrases, and the new frontier was his. but
dedication to health and education and workplace safety. i know he will do an outstanding job and i appreciate you holding this hearing on mental health, the initial one. my first question is for administrator hyde. i want to know more about the coordination and collaboration of agencies at the federal, state and local level within your appropriate role as a federal agency, what needs to be done to better enhance that coordination and collaboration of agencies at the federal, state and local level? >> thank you, we have been trying hard to recognize the relationship between states and local communities because the state of and will create laws, rules, regulations that the community has respond to so when we provide grants to our communities we are trying to say how does this relate to the state plan and direction? when providing grants to our states we're trying to ask how are you bringing your communities into that process so we are by our grandmaking trying to bring them together through community block grant application process and asking how these things really to what is going
really understood the press has educational media, educational tv. there was -- everything that had been going on that we were involved in had been going on for a hundred years. and it was very hard to get out. now, i was -- because this is 1963, i was reminded that fred shuttles word came to get martin luther king on the 17th of december to promise that he would come to birmingham this year. but that is because on the 14th or 15th fred's church had been bombed for the third time in 1962. there had been 60 bombings of homes that had received no publicity. and fred shuttles worth was quite frank that he needed martin luther king to come over there to get any attention to this injustice. now, one of my other good friends, a guy who had been with us in the movement from cameraman was quite blunt with me about a, saying, look, you're going to have to cut me some slack because i have to keep the camera on dr. king because if they kill him and i don't get a picture of it, i lose my job. no, it was almost that cold and analysis where martin luther king knew that he was being used to focus on th
, and they developed personal finance out of this over a period of years with the goal to educate people so the great depression does not happen again. it's very much in a way of its time, and the idea that we can teach people skills, and if they learn the skills, we'll be okay. what goes on over time is personal finance slowly becomes severed from a greater extent of this, and there's less about the political backbone of it and always to be fair to porter for a good part of her career, a huge part of the thinking, and how to toilet train your toddler, how to cook, follow these ten steps, and all will be okay, and if you don't, it's not going to be okay; therefore, if you followed the ten steps, it has to have worked out, and if it didn't work out, then you didn't follow the steps. it's all op you, and that's over a period of years what started personal finance. >> host: do you see the same parallel i saw between the financial media and fashion media? if you don't look like this gorgeous young anorexic model, there's something wrong with you? if you are not saving a hundred thousand a year, getting 2
in a world where they're so closed to the changing social makeup of -- who is the educated work force in the united states anymore? mostly women, more and more diverse, and i you work at exxonmobil and go home to your family thanksgiving dinner and say i work at exxonmobil and half your cousins and your brothers look at you in disdain or worry, that's not a wing strategy over 30 years. so something has to give, i think. i'm not sure they think that, though. >> host: that's one of my questions, too. is that it seems to me that kind of, we are who we are and take it or leave it, don't care what everybody else thinks about that -- has that backfired on them? seems that could have been a force to cultivate more distrust and distaste, and help make them, as you say in the book, public enemy number one at pointness their history. >> guest: yeah. well, it's a great question and a kind of complicated one. i think one of my goals as a reporter was to try to understand as best i could and to think about what is it like to be so unpopular? does it matter? their default view, doesn't matter. just
, started megachurches, educational institutions and eventually became deeply involved in politics. beverly lehay who is a particular interest of mine in this book founded a group called conservative women for america which still claims to be the largest women's political organization in the united states, and she based her organization on five spiritual principles; the bible, the family, patriotism, the sanctity of marriage, the sanctity of life. and she began to litigate arguing that religious parents should have more control, for example, over what their children were taught in school, arguing that, um, the era, the equal rights amendment for women, was a violation of the fundamental order of things and winning many of these cases. >> host: did you interview her for your book? >> guest: i did not. she actually lives in seclusion now. she's very -- she retired about almost 15 years ago now and lives, um, in california again. >> host: somebody you would have liked to have talked to? >> guest: i would very much like to talk to her. and one of the things that i think is really important is t
and how they keep that oil -- getting makerbot is educational and how things are made in the manufacturing process and in the world around us. you can play me. >> host: where did you come up with the idea of? >> guest: 3-d printers have been around for 25 years but they were mainframe sized machines that were really expensive. i wanted one that i couldn't afford one. so some friends and i got together and we started tinkering. when it worked we quit our jobs and started makerbot so everybody could have one of these. >> host: bre pettis is the founder of makerbot in the ceo of the makerbot corporation out of brooklyn new york one of the hottest products here on the floor of ces. you have been watching "the communicators" on c-span
is a fearless leader, answering the call to serve throughout his career. work on issues from education and transporation to civil rights and national service advanced the causes of the party immeasurably. please join me in thanking our retiring officers. they have done a remarkable service for the entire country. [applause] now let me introduce our slate of new dnc officers. they are a talented, dedicated and passionate group of people who will strengthen and energize our party. marina alana, with your support today, serve as vice chair of the dnc. maria's work as executive treasurer of the los angeles county federation of labor and years of service as president of the tier local 11 # reaffirm our party's steadfast commitment to american workers. she'll strengthen the bond between the dnc and brothers and sisters in the labor movement. my friends, congresswoman of hawaii, with your support today, will also serve as vice chair. she's the first american indue member of congress, and along with the congresswoman of illinois, one of the first female combat veterans to serve in congress. [a
investments in infrastructure. we say that training and education must be expanded to build the workforce we need for a 21st century global economy. and we call for an expanded focus on ports, exports and advanced manufacturing to great more jobs in america and reduce our trade imbalance. on all of these issues we took aggressive action. our conference of mayors engage direct with the obama administration and congress through every step of fiscal cliff negotiations. at the national press club on september 15, we released a letter to vice president scott smith, our second vice president kevin johnson and i drafted, 131 of our mayors sign, calling on congress to adopt a bipartisan and balanced approach deficit reduction by incorporating spending cuts with additional revenue. we took the same message to both political conventions and to the presidential debate where mayors of both parties were active and visible participants, speaking for commonsense solutions to the pending fiscal crisis. in just one week after the election, our leadership came to washington. we met with the vice president bid
this critical issue is the establishment of the recruiting, education and training oversight counsel. this counsel will include the senior leadership of my command and it will one, review the progress and effectiveness of the actions we are not implementing. two, provide an expanded perspective on future actions we will take to prevent problems from recurring. and three, advise me on strategic issues affecting airmen safety and the maidens of good order and discipline in basic military training. in short, this counsel will help us institutionalize the intense levels of locus we must sustain if we are to successfully defeat the threat of sexual misconduct and the basic military training environment. i look forward to your questions after general welsh's remarks. thank you. >> thank you and i completely agreed the investigations don't marked the end of anything. the air force has recommitted itself to free insuring every airmen is treated with respect. it's not a one time fix. it has to be a way of life. this collection of events in basic military training has been stunning to most of
of you. and our goal is to educate people so that this great depression can never happen again. but it's very much in the wake oof the time an idea that we can teach people certain skills and if they learn the skills we will all be okay spent the dark set of the personal-finance industry with helaine olen saturday night at 10 on after words on c-span2. look for more booktv online, like this on facebook. >> i think it's all an evolutionary process. you go into this role and my sense is that you never get comfortable if you're always pushing for change and growth, not just in yourself but in the issues you care about. you are never done. so there's never a point in time where you feel like, they are, i am now here and i can do this the same way all the time. it's always changing. they changed is given the status issues of the country, and you never know what those are going to be from one day to the next. so you have to be flexible and fluid, and open to revolve. >> the first ladies, their private and public lives. c-span is teaming up with the white house historical association for a fi
for education. we also must insure economic development and political progress, political development. these things and these principles are very important, and this is why the arab spring took place at the end of the day. and i believe that such principles are still not respected in our countries, such freedoms are not yet respected. we still have a long way to go. regardless of what the west thinks or does not think, we don't really -- we should not really mind what the west says. the west can speak and say, and we also can speak and say whatever we think. however, i believe that the reform process must start from us, must start from the arab world. so that we would bring back the human dignity to each citizen. we must respect individuals, and we must not force any citizen to do anything that he or she does not want to do. i believe that it's the arab spring happened because of the oppression that we were living under. that oppression took away our freedoms, our liberties, our human rights, and that is why i believe that we need this revolution, we needed this revolution, and we nee
the cool ant goes and how they keep that separate from the oil. getting a makerbot is also an education in how things are made in the manufacturing process and in the world around us. >> host: are you the inventer? >> guest: you can blame me. [laughter] where did you come up with the idea? >> guest: you know, 3-d printers have been around for about 25 years, but they were mainframe-size machines that were really expensive. i wanted one. but i couldn't afford one. so some friends and i got together, and we started tinkering. and when it worked, we quit our jobs and started makerbot so everybody could have one of these. >> host: bre pettis is the founder of makerbot and the ceo of the makerbot corporation out of brooklyn, new york, one of the ottest products on -- hottest products here on the floor of ces. [inaudible conversations] >> host: and you've been watching "the communicators" on c-span from las vegas and ces international 2013, the technology show. we will be back next week with more programming from this con convention. >> david maraniss began researching and writing his tenth b
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